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Centennial Park

Centennial Park, a 13 acre tract extending from Grove Avenue to Wakefield Avenue, is the largest natural open space in Metuchen. The Grove Avenue service road grants access to the area. Centennial Park includes Beacon Hill, Metuchen’s highest point, with an elevation of 169 feet. Many plant and animal species, particularly birds, can be viewed from the walking trails. The land was purchased with a matching grant from the first Green Acres bond issue to preserve the natural environment for passive recreation. The official ribbon cutting and opening of Centennial Park was held on Earth Day 2000, which coincided with the Borough’s centennial celebrations. Extensions to the walking paths are planned for the near future.


The stairs, constructed by our Department of Public Works,
lead visitors from the Grove Avenue service road to the park.


Visitors are welcome to relax at the entrance to Centennial Park. 


Metuchen Centennial Park
This park, established in the year 2000 to create a passive recreational area for the residents of Metuchen, shall serve as a reminder of the 100th anniversary celebration of our Borough's incorporation. It is also a tribute to the outstanding achievements of the Metuchen Centennial Commission and the many citizens of our community who participated in the various activities conducted throughout that very special year.  
Mayor and Council


Access along the path is provided by this hand made wooden bridge over an area of uneven terrain.

Centennial Park has many large trees. Look for evidence of the wildlife living here, such as this hole. Listen carefully for bird song and the scurrying of small animals.


There are many areas of dense undergrowth where natural processes are allowed to continue. This fallen tree permits sunlight to reach its potential replacement.